Commissioner Brendan Carr on Title II and stifling Internet innovation

by on December 13, 2017 · 0 comments

In 2015 after White House pressure, the FCC decided to take the radical step of classifying “broadband Internet access service” as a heavily-regulated Title II service. Title II was created for the AT&T long-distance monopoly and telegraph network and “promoting innovation and competition” is not its purpose. It’s ill-suited for the modern Internet, where hundreds of ISPs and tech companies are experimenting with new technologies and topologies.

Commissioner Brendan Carr was gracious enough to speak with Chris Koopman and me in a Mercatus podcast last week about his decision to vote to reverse the Title II classification. The podcast can be found at the Mercatus website. One highlight from Commissioner Carr:

Congress had a fork in the road. …In 1996, Congress made a decision that we’re going to head down the Title I route [for the Internet]. That decision has been one of the greatest public policy decisions that we’ve ever seen. That’s what led to the massive investment in the Internet. Over a trillion dollars invested. Consumers were protected. Innovators were free to innovate. Unfortunately, two years ago the Commission departed from that framework and moved into a very different heavy-handed regulatory world, the Title II approach.

Along those lines, in my recent ex parte meeting with Chairman Pai’s office, I pointed to an interesting 2002 study in the Review of Economics and Statistics from MIT Press about the stifling effects of Title II regulation:

[E]xisting economics scholarship suggests that a permissioned approach to new services, like that proposed in the [2015] Open Internet Order, inhibits innovation and new services in telecommunications. As a result of an FCC decision and a subsequent court decision in the late 1990s, for 18 to 30 months, depending on the firm, [Title II] carriers were deregulated and did not have to submit new offerings to the FCC for review. After the court decision, the FCC required carriers to file retroactive plans for services introduced after deregulation.

This turn of events allowed economist James Preiger to analyze and compare the rate of new services deployment in the regulated period and the brief deregulated period. Preiger found that “some otherwise profitable services are not financially viable under” the permissioned regime. Critically, the number of services carriers deployed “during the [deregulated] interim is 60%-99% larger than the model predicts they would have created” when preapproval was required. Finally, Preiger found that firms would have introduced 62% more services during the entire study period if there was no permissioned regime. This is suggestive evidence that the Order’s “Mother, May I?” approach will significantly harm the Internet services market.

Thankfully, this FCC has incorporated economic scholarship into its Restoring Internet Freedom Order and will undo the costly Title II classification for Internet services.

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