Courts Confront Changing Attitudes towards Privacy

by on September 14, 2009 · 8 comments

Finally, the courts are starting to take notice of the growing ease with which we all share information online: “Twenty-somethings have a much-reduced sense of personal privacy,” as an NYU law professor put it. Unfortunately, this slow realization of the utterly obvious is happening in the narrow area of legal ethics: Courts are punishing young lawyers who say unkind things about the court on social networking sites or say something inconsistent with what they’ve told the court. It’s a must-read for all young lawyers!

  • MikeRT

    But Mr. Conway is a lawyer. And unlike millions of other online hotheads, he found himself hauled up before the Florida bar, which in April issued a reprimand and a fine for his intemperate blog post.

    Punish a guy for saying some hostile things about a judge, but they wink and nod as prosecutors routinely resort to unethical behavior like using the testilies of jailhouse snitches and withholding exculpatory evidence.

    With priorities like that, it's no wonder why the public believes the system doesn't work.

  • MikeRT

    But Mr. Conway is a lawyer. And unlike millions of other online hotheads, he found himself hauled up before the Florida bar, which in April issued a reprimand and a fine for his intemperate blog post.

    Punish a guy for saying some hostile things about a judge, but they wink and nod as prosecutors routinely resort to unethical behavior like using the testilies of jailhouse snitches and withholding exculpatory evidence.

    With priorities like that, it's no wonder why the public believes the system doesn't work.

  • MikeRT

    But Mr. Conway is a lawyer. And unlike millions of other online hotheads, he found himself hauled up before the Florida bar, which in April issued a reprimand and a fine for his intemperate blog post.

    Punish a guy for saying some hostile things about a judge, but they wink and nod as prosecutors routinely resort to unethical behavior like using the testilies of jailhouse snitches and withholding exculpatory evidence.

    With priorities like that, it's no wonder why the public believes the system doesn't work.

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