Privacy Regulation: Expensive and Ineffective

by on May 22, 2009 · 9 comments

Lee Gomes writes on Fobes.com with a clear-eyed reminder that privacy regulation has been costly, yet failed to deliver. Lovers of government intervention will, of course, take this as an argument to double-down.

  • DB

    Interesting piece, though I think Gomes is off-base to lump Fred Cate's air travel example in with the others. There is a difference between burdening the private sector with complicated privacy regulations, and stopping the government from amassing huge databases of personal information in violation of our civil liberties.

    I don't think Jim Harper is the kind of privacy “absolutist” that Gomes has in mind:
    http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/2009/05/15/tight

  • http://srynas.blogspot.com/ Steve R.

    Mr. Gomes article is good. I will even agree it is expensive and useless, but this article really is NOT privacy regulation. Mr. Gomes writes: “On the one hand, laws designed to keep consumers apprised of privacy issues have resulted in a deluge of privacy notices, consent forms and security alerts into mailboxes, both real and electronic.”. Mr. Gomes's article is really about requiring that the companies disclose their policies and not actually forcing the companies to respect the consumers privacy. If one takes a look at many of these policies you will see that the company reserve to themselves the right to disclose virtually all your personal information to anyone at their whim.

    As you can guess, to me, we really don't have laws PROTECTING privacy. Even those laws that supposedly protect privacy are so watered down that they are useless. Canadians Getting More Telemarketing Calls After Putting Names On Do Not Call List

    We can have a simple inexpensive regulation that protects privacy (to a degree). All companies should be prohibited from sharing private information, all telemarketing should be prohibited, as well as prohibiting unsolicited promotions. If someone wants to participate they can opt-in.

  • http://srynas.blogspot.com/ Steve R.

    Mr. Gomes article is good. I will even agree it is expensive and useless, but this article really is NOT privacy regulation. Mr. Gomes writes: “On the one hand, laws designed to keep consumers apprised of privacy issues have resulted in a deluge of privacy notices, consent forms and security alerts into mailboxes, both real and electronic.”. Mr. Gomes's article is really about requiring that the companies disclose their policies and not actually forcing the companies to respect the consumers privacy. If one takes a look at many of these policies you will see that the company reserve to themselves the right to disclose virtually all your personal information to anyone at their whim.

    As you can guess, to me, we really don't have laws PROTECTING privacy. Even those laws that supposedly protect privacy are so watered down that they are useless. Canadians Getting More Telemarketing Calls After Putting Names On Do Not Call List

    We can have a simple inexpensive regulation that protects privacy (to a degree). All companies should be prohibited from sharing private information, all telemarketing should be prohibited, as well as prohibiting unsolicited promotions. If someone wants to participate they can opt-in.

  • http://srynas.blogspot.com/ Steve R.

    Mr. Gomes article is good. I will even agree it is expensive and useless, but this article really is NOT privacy regulation. Mr. Gomes writes: “On the one hand, laws designed to keep consumers apprised of privacy issues have resulted in a deluge of privacy notices, consent forms and security alerts into mailboxes, both real and electronic.”. Mr. Gomes's article is really about requiring that the companies disclose their policies and not actually forcing the companies to respect the consumers privacy. If one takes a look at many of these policies you will see that the company reserve to themselves the right to disclose virtually all your personal information to anyone at their whim.

    As you can guess, to me, we really don't have laws PROTECTING privacy. Even those laws that supposedly protect privacy are so watered down that they are useless. Canadians Getting More Telemarketing Calls After Putting Names On Do Not Call List

    We can have a simple inexpensive regulation that protects privacy (to a degree). All companies should be prohibited from sharing private information, all telemarketing should be prohibited, as well as prohibiting unsolicited promotions. If someone wants to participate they can opt-in.

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