The End of “the American Internet” and the Future of Content Controls

by on September 1, 2008 · 10 comments

John Markoff had an interesting article in the New York Times this weekend entitled “Internet Traffic Begins to Bypass the U.S..” In the piece, Markoff notes that “The era of the American Internet is ending” since “data is increasingly flowing around the United States,” instead of all flowing though our country, as it once did. Markoff focuses on how that “may have intelligence — and conceivably military — consequences.”
Net traffic
Indeed, it may. But what I also found interesting about this fact is the implications it will have for the future of content regulation. As Harvard’s Yochai Benkler told the Times, “This is one of many dimensions on which we’ll have to adjust to a reduction in American ability to dictate terms of core interests of ours.” Content controls are one way that lawmakers enforce what they perceive to be a country’s “core interests.” As less and less Internet traffic flows through the U.S., it could become increasingly difficult for American lawmakers to impose their particular vision or morality on the Internet.

And that’s both good and bad news.


That’s good news when we consider the ways in which American lawmakers might look to restrict online speech and commerce. For example: regulation of speech on social networking sites, or efforts to regulate online gambling. Our lawmakers shouldn’t be regulating those things, and as more traffic moves offshore, it might make it more difficult for them to do so. I discussed this point at greater length in my essay about the book I never finished: “The End of Censorship: The Future of Content Controls in a World of Media Convergence.”

But that is also bad news in the sense that, relatively speaking, the United States is a stronger defender of online free speech and commerce than most other countries on this planet. As more and more Net traffic begins to flow through other countries and continents, it may become more somewhat easier for repressive states to exert undue influence over the Web.

Then again, it may be the case that the game of regulatory whack-a-mole just becomes more challenging for those countries as well even as a greater percentage of traffic flows across their borders.

What do you think? Will less Net traffic flowing through the U.S. hurt or help the cause of online free speech and global commerce?

  • Hilarion

    Oh, my! Won't that make it harder for entities such as DHS and the NSA to acquire everyone's traffic which moves through the US? That is not such a terrible result since such “eaves-dropping” occurred and still occurs illegally.

  • awolbushape

    Hilaron is right on. Shunning the mainstream media is causing those businesses to dive and they are not happy about it. Most of us get our real news of what's going on in the world off the net. Laws are in the works in the u.s. to curb dissent and declare all “thought crimes” as the same thing as actual criminal/terrorist action. Protests at the capital are not covered at all by mainstream media even when hundreds of thousands show up. I wouldn't even know about them if I couldn't access alternate news sites. Those alternate blogs are getting real slow as telecoms are putting them on snail speed; while allowing corp sites lightspeed.

    Getting out of the united police states of america is a good thing imho.

  • awolbushape

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  • Thundercross

    It's quite clear to me that this isn't over paranoia over American spies or control freaks guaranteeing control over what can be said or not.

    It's because the American telecoms haven't developed their infrastructure in several years because they were holding out for more money. We've become the bottleneck of the internet. We've become the point on the net where everything slows down to 8MBPS or so. We're hurting the internet as a whole, and until the telecoms get back to laying down cable, the other countries are going to HAVE to reroute around us. However, if the companies manage to do that content discrimination thing they want to do, it's gonna be absolutely necessary to completely reroute around the US, lest packets get dropped like crazy.

  • Bubba

    @Thundercross
    I'm a sysadmin in Europe with control over multiple machines. I have (over the years) been moving those servers from the U.S. to locations in Europe – mostly because I don't want the NSA to get a copy of all our traffic (no matter how benign) and/or be under the jurisdiction of U.S. courts.

  • Bubba

    @Thundercross
    I'm a sysadmin in Europe with control over multiple machines. I have (over the years) been moving those servers from the U.S. to locations in Europe – mostly because I don't want the NSA to get a copy of all our traffic (no matter how benign) and/or be under the jurisdiction of U.S. courts.

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