NRSC – On the Barricades!

by on July 18, 2007 · 4 comments

The imagery that you see here on the TechLiberationFront site is a clever little rhetorical flourish, I think. We’re mostly free-market types, but our Maoist-Soviet-Che Guevara-ish imagery skewers the idea that the political left has a lock on revolutionary ideas, dissent, civil liberties, and – oh, I don’t know – gusto.

So I’m delighted to find a Web site in a similar vein from none other than the National Republican Senatorial Committee. They have a site up called StopLiberalCensorship.com, which carries a revolutionary (if partisan) message:

Free speech is under attack.

As Democrats in Congress eagerly line up to legislate what you hear on the radio it begs the question: what’s next? Newspapers? There’s no end in sight to their power grab.

It’s about the Fairness Doctrine, the idea of requiring media to apportion their messages and content based on political judgments and direction. James Gattuso and other TLFers have rightly criticized it in spades. Adam specifically called out Democrats’ abandonment of free speech here.

The site seeks people to sign a petition saying that “Republicans should do everything in their power to defeat the Democrats’ attempts to trample our First Amendment rights.”

It’s a welcome turn of the tables to see Republicans on the barricades – in berets, perhaps? – defending freedom. Viva la revolucion!

S. 1748, the Broadcaster Freedom Act of 2007 is the Senate bill to abolish the Fairness Doctrine.

Update: Here’s the vote on an amendment to prevent the Federal Communications Commission from repromulgating the fairness doctrine. Forty-seven Democrats (and the independent who caucuses with the Democrats) voted against it.

  • http://mcgath.blogspot.com Gary McGath

    This seems to be “National misuse ‘beg the question’ day” on the Internet. (I know, you just quoted the site.)

    To beg the question is to assume the point that you’re arguing for. It isn’t the same as “raise the question.”

  • http://mcgath.blogspot.com Gary McGath

    This seems to be “National misuse ‘beg the question’ day” on the Internet. (I know, you just quoted the site.)

    To beg the question is to assume the point that you’re arguing for. It isn’t the same as “raise the question.”

  • http://www.nab.org Nabisco

    Supporters of the so-called Fairness Doctrine assert that its reincarnation will lead to a more informed citizenry and a diversity of voices on the airwaves. I’ve been doing some work with the NAB, and if history is any indicator, this assertion is simply not true. During the original incarnation of the Fairness Doctrine, broadcasters shied away from airing issue based content, as doing so was easier than attempting to cover every perspective of an issue. As a result, the public was actually less informed than they would have been were free discussion allowed to take place. So in an era of both terrestrial and satellite radio; broadcast, cable, and satellite television; and the ever-expanding Internet, consumers have countless options when it comes to getting their information and every perspective of any issue is readily available. Simply put, the notion and usefulness of legislating “fairness” on the airwaves is obsolete, and any attempt to do so will only deprive the public of passioned discussion of the issues and cut into the advertising revenue on which broadcasters rely.

  • http://www.nab.org Nabisco

    Supporters of the so-called Fairness Doctrine assert that its reincarnation will lead to a more informed citizenry and a diversity of voices on the airwaves. I’ve been doing some work with the NAB, and if history is any indicator, this assertion is simply not true. During the original incarnation of the Fairness Doctrine, broadcasters shied away from airing issue based content, as doing so was easier than attempting to cover every perspective of an issue. As a result, the public was actually less informed than they would have been were free discussion allowed to take place. So in an era of both terrestrial and satellite radio; broadcast, cable, and satellite television; and the ever-expanding Internet, consumers have countless options when it comes to getting their information and every perspective of any issue is readily available. Simply put, the notion and usefulness of legislating “fairness” on the airwaves is obsolete, and any attempt to do so will only deprive the public of passioned discussion of the issues and cut into the advertising revenue on which broadcasters rely.

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