TPW 16: Wireless Carterfone, Korean Copyright Deal, and Broadcast Decency

by on June 8, 2007 · 2 comments


Tech Policy Weekly from the Technology Liberation Front is a weekly podcast about technology policy from TLF’s learned band of contributors. The shows’s panelists this week are Adam Thierer of the Progress and Freedom Foundation, Tim Lee of the Cato Institute, Prof. Tim Wu of the Columbia University Law School, and Gwen Hinze of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Topics include,

  • Tim Wu explains his wireless Carterfone proposal,
  • The United States signs a trade agreement with South Korea that includes some controversial copyright provisions, and
  • The FCC loses on appeal in an important broadcast decency case.

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  • Tom Coseven

    Good discourse on wireless. The CTIA is chartered to independently certify standard devices. Open attachment can be enforced, if America wants it. There is a worldwide problem with blocking (or charging extra for) certain features on mobile networks. I don’t understand why Tim Wu needs to position it as a unique US innovation problem. South Korea is probably the most open and Japan/Italy are the most closed. The US is closer to South Korea than Italy.

  • Tom Coseven

    Good discourse on wireless. The CTIA is chartered to independently certify standard devices. Open attachment can be enforced, if America wants it. There is a worldwide problem with blocking (or charging extra for) certain features on mobile networks. I don’t understand why Tim Wu needs to position it as a unique US innovation problem. South Korea is probably the most open and Japan/Italy are the most closed. The US is closer to South Korea than Italy.

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