More on Underdogs and Net Neutering

by on May 19, 2006 · 4 comments

A few months ago I posted about a site called Consumeraffairs.com that referred to supporters of net neutrality regulation as a “rag tag band.” Pointing out that any coalition that includes the likes of Microsoft and Google simply cannot be “rag tag,” I concluded that “even wearing Underdog’s cape, net neutrality rules just won’t fly”.

Now it seems that while they didn’t quite get the substantive message, consumeraffairs.com has picked up some of the terminology. In a story posted yesterday, it lauded Rep. James Sensenbrenner for introducing a net regulation bill, saying “when it comes to the issue of net neutrality, Sensenbrenner is on the side of the underdog.”

At the risk of becoming repetitive, the underdog in this particular catfight includes the following companies (along with their rank on the Fortune 500 list):

Microsoft (48)
Intel (49)
Amazon.com (272)
Google (353)
Yahoo (412)
ebay (458)

Add to this the potential support of financial services firms, and underdog is looking like a pretty big pooch. This is not to say that regulation opponents don’t have some heavy-hitters on their side (for instance, a pack of tech manufacturers announced their opposition Wednesday). But it doesn’t take a bloodhound to see that this isn’t a big guy v. little guy fight.

Underdog’s cape still just doesn’t fit.

  • Barry

    When you apply the same “underdog argument” to the issue of DRM, for example, you see technology and software companies falling over each other to satisfy the content industry, despite the content industry being orders of magnitude smaller than the technology and software industries. Why is it that you suppose companies like Microsoft or Intel or Samsung or whoever are willing to accede to the RIAA/MPAA’s demands, despite being much larger companies in a much, much larger industry?

  • Barry

    When you apply the same “underdog argument” to the issue of DRM, for example, you see technology and software companies falling over each other to satisfy the content industry, despite the content industry being orders of magnitude smaller than the technology and software industries. Why is it that you suppose companies like Microsoft or Intel or Samsung or whoever are willing to accede to the RIAA/MPAA’s demands, despite being much larger companies in a much, much larger industry?

  • http://www.blindmindseye.com MikeT

    James, the latest rhetoric from the ISPs is that Google and Microsoft want to stick the public with practically all of the costs. Neither side is innocent here. In fact, I can’t see why anyone is particularly sympathetic to either side.

  • http://www.blindmindseye.com MikeT

    James, the latest rhetoric from the ISPs is that Google and Microsoft want to stick the public with practically all of the costs. Neither side is innocent here. In fact, I can’t see why anyone is particularly sympathetic to either side.

Previous post:

Next post: