International Bureaucrats to Seize Control of the Internet

by on November 11, 2004 · 2 comments

The U.N.’s Working Group on Internet Governance is the careful effort of overpaid international bureaucrats to seize control of the Internet on behalf of have-not countries and drive it into the ground – er, I mean, to create an “open and inclusive” process and “a mechanism for the full and active participation of governments, the private sector and civil society from both developing and developed countries, involving relevant intergovernmental and international organizations and forums.” Or something.

Look through the list of countries represented in the working group, announced today and listed at the bottom of this page. Sure enough, it’s larded up with academics and bureaucrats from backwater foreign countries like Mauritius, China, Kenya, and Rhode Island. In July 2005, they will assuredly report back to the U.N. Secretary-General that international bureaucratic control of the Internet is needed.

Which raises the crucial question about Internet Governance: If the report of a U.N. Working Group is totally irrelevant, does the U.N. Working Group actually exist?

  • http://www.cei.org Richard Morrison

    I’m more tempted by the question: If the report of a U.N. Working Group isn’t totally irrelevant, is it really a U.N. Working Group?

  • http://www.cei.org Richard Morrison

    I’m more tempted by the question: If the report of a U.N. Working Group isn’t totally irrelevant, is it really a U.N. Working Group?

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