Planet Moron on the FCC’s National Broadband Plan

by on February 27, 2010 · 2 comments

Planet Moron.com has taken a humorous look at the FCC’s pending National Broadband Plan (“We’re Digitally Distressed At How Much This Is Going To Cost Us.”) It’s quite entertaining.  They note:

If you are like most Americans, three questions probably pop into your mind:

1) Am I paying for this?
2) Seriously, am I paying for this?
3) Because if I’m paying for this, I’m going to be really ticked off.

Indeed, it’s probably going to cost us a lot more than we can possible imagine, especially with all the lawyering and lobbying that will accompany it.  Oh well, that’s Washington for you–we pay $2 bucks to get $1 worth of benefits. I’m voting for the National Elevator Plan instead.

  • Bret Glass

    Yep, you (as a taxpayer and consumer) are already paying for this. Hundreds of thousands of billable hours for lawyers filing papers, debating, suing. (Just look at the volumes of filings at the FCC.) Lost opportunities due to fewer choices of broadband providers (because investors are being spooked by the prospect of regulation). Billions in ARRA broadband funds going to financially unsustainable projects that will collapse due to “network neutrality” restrictions. And, if the FCC issues the rules in its NPRM, even more restrictions on what you can buy and how it can be provided. (See, for example, my filing at http://www.brettglass.com/nprmcomment.pdf)

    What's more, the proceeding is distracting the FCC from fixing problems that actually need fixing, such as the (government-induced) market failure in “middle mile” data transport.

  • Bret Glass

    Yep, you (as a taxpayer and consumer) are already paying for this. Hundreds of thousands of billable hours for lawyers filing papers, debating, suing. (Just look at the volumes of filings at the FCC.) Lost opportunities due to fewer choices of broadband providers (because investors are being spooked by the prospect of regulation). Billions in ARRA broadband funds going to financially unsustainable projects that will collapse due to “network neutrality” restrictions. And, if the FCC issues the rules in its NPRM, even more restrictions on what you can buy and how it can be provided. (See, for example, my filing at http://www.brettglass.com/nprmcomment.pdf)

    What's more, the proceeding is distracting the FCC from fixing problems that actually need fixing, such as the (government-induced) market failure in “middle mile” data transport.

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