Paul Graham on Software Patents

by on April 18, 2007 · 6 comments

A very interesting essay from Paul Graham on software patents, including the argument that patents for hardware also constitute patents on algorithms.

  • http://www2.blogger.com/profile/14380731108416527657 Steve R.

    Excellent article. A very good read from the tactical perspective. Graham wrote:
    When you read of big companies filing patent suits against smaller ones, it’s usually a big company on the way down, grasping at straws. For example, Unisys’s attempts to enforce their patent on LZW compression. When you see a big company threatening patent suits, sell. When a company starts fighting over IP, it’s a sign they’ve lost the real battle, for users.”

  • http://www2.blogger.com/profile/14380731108416527657 Steve R.

    Excellent article. A very good read from the tactical perspective. Graham wrote:
    When you read of big companies filing patent suits against smaller ones, it’s usually a big company on the way down, grasping at straws. For example, Unisys’s attempts to enforce their patent on LZW compression. When you see a big company threatening patent suits, sell. When a company starts fighting over IP, it’s a sign they’ve lost the real battle, for users.”

  • http://www2.blogger.com/profile/14380731108416527657 Steve R.

    Unfortunately, I had to run, so I was not able to add a concluding remark. Graham’s excellent article upholds my belief that so-called intellectual property has only minimal impetus for promoting innovation and is simply a big company club to squelch competition.

  • http://www2.blogger.com/profile/14380731108416527657 Steve R.

    Unfortunately, I had to run, so I was not able to add a concluding remark. Graham’s excellent article upholds my belief that so-called intellectual property has only minimal impetus for promoting innovation and is simply a big company club to squelch competition.

  • http://linuxworld.com/community/ Don Marti

    Of course mechanical patents can be considered as algorithm patents, because mechanisms can be considered as analog computers (example).

    The question is where do you draw the line of what activities can constitute patent infringement.

  • http://linuxworld.com/community/ Don Marti

    Of course mechanical patents can be considered as algorithm patents, because mechanisms can be considered as analog computers (example).

    The question is where do you draw the line of what activities can constitute patent infringement.

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