Big Brother Trips Over a Small State

by on April 26, 2006 · 4 comments

The New Hampshire Senate Committee on Pubic and Municipal Affairs unanimously approved legislation to refuse the state’s participation in the REAL ID Act today. The bill passed the House with a large favorable vote and is scheduled for a full Senate vote within two weeks.

Both the Manchester Union Leader and the Concord Monitor editorialized in favor of the bill, which would prevent New Hampshire from participating in a national ID program. ADDED: The Nashua Telegraph also favors the bill. ADDED: Video of a rally in favor of the bill to kill REAL ID in New Hampshire.

This is a very exciting opportunity for a small state to topple a big-government program – and, oh, might I add, protect all of our privacy and liberties by forcing a debate on national ID in the U.S. Congress. More to come on this in the future and in my forthcoming book, Identity Crisis: How Identification is Overused and Misunderstood.

  • http://www.blindmindseye.com MikeT

    What they do need to regulate is the process for handing out the licenses. Some states make it way too easy for people to get licenses without identifying themselves.

  • http://www.blindmindseye.com MikeT

    What they do need to regulate is the process for handing out the licenses. Some states make it way too easy for people to get licenses without identifying themselves.

  • http://www.cato.org/people/harper.html Jim Harper

    It kinda depends on what the license is for. If it’s a license to drive, I don’t think recidivism among bad drivers is a big enough problem to justify the measures found in the REAL ID Act. If it’s a license to work, reside in the U.S., open bank accounts, and travel, then you need more care in issuing licenses, but then you’ve stumbled right into a national ID and accompanying surveillance system. We can design identification systems better than that.

  • http://www.cato.org/people/harper.html Jim Harper

    It kinda depends on what the license is for. If it’s a license to drive, I don’t think recidivism among bad drivers is a big enough problem to justify the measures found in the REAL ID Act. If it’s a license to work, reside in the U.S., open bank accounts, and travel, then you need more care in issuing licenses, but then you’ve stumbled right into a national ID and accompanying surveillance system. We can design identification systems better than that.

Previous post:

Next post: