A Trillion Here, A Trillion There: Counting the Benefits of Broadband

by on December 8, 2005 · 4 comments

The New Milenium Research Council today released a study on the benefits of broadband, which finds almost $1 trillion in benefits related to elderly and disabled Americans alone. Its a pretty good study, authored by Brooking’s Robert Litan. Overall, a good contribution to the debate, underscoring the importance of this technology. Of course, the number is just an estimate (as Litan himself says), since so many of the benefits of quick and easy Internet access just aren’t quantifiable. For instance, how do you value the innovations that haven’t yet been innovated? The analysis in the paper gives a pretty good sense of this unpredictablity. The report is worth reading and is sure to come up often in broadband policy debates.

  • http://www.cato.org/people/harper.html Jim Harper

    Meanwhile, no more luminous (and uptight) a figure than George Will is excoriating Mr. Gattuso for apparently supporting a $3 billion subsidy aimed at greasing the recovery of all this lost consumer welfare.

    Yesterday, I told a reporter (of lesser importance and primness) that I wouldn’t support it, but I might hold my nose for it . . . .

    How do you plead, Gattuso?

  • http://www.cato.org/people/harper.html Jim Harper

    Meanwhile, no more luminous (and uptight) a figure than George Will is excoriating Mr. Gattuso for apparently supporting a $3 billion subsidy aimed at greasing the recovery of all this lost consumer welfare.

    Yesterday, I told a reporter (of lesser importance and primness) that I wouldn’t support it, but I might hold my nose for it . . . .

    How do you plead, Gattuso?

  • James Gattuso

    I plead ambiguity on the part of Mr. Will. I’m most certainly against the subsidy, and he was kind enough to cite me in his piece. However, passing reference are difficult things, and it was quite clear in the piece where I stood It was a particularly confusing, since he cited my summary of the other sides arguments. Here’s the piece that got Will started: http://www.heritage.org/Research/Regulation/wm8

  • James Gattuso

    I plead ambiguity on the part of Mr. Will. I’m most certainly against the subsidy, and he was kind enough to cite me in his piece. However, passing reference are difficult things, and it was quite clear in the piece where I stood It was a particularly confusing, since he cited my summary of the other sides arguments. Here’s the piece that got Will started: http://www.heritage.org/Research/Regulation/wm891.cfm

Previous post:

Next post: